High Heat 257+

High Heat 257+

Dean Knuth worked for the USGA for many, many years. He has seen everything when it comes to golf clubs. The USGA decided that 257 microseconds on the face was going to the limit in which the ball can use the “Trampoline” effect on the club face. If it is longer that 257 microseconds then it is too hot. But here is the loop hole. The USGA changed the rule to allow outside of the width of a golf ball to be up to 257 microseconds in the trampoline effect. So, in essence, you gain more trampoline and more heat on the heel and the toe, thus counterbalancing the loss of performance that you normally get.

By allowing this to go on the outside of the club face, High Heat developed their High Heat 257+ driver, metal woods and hybrids. There won’t ever be a golfer that hits the golf ball in the center every time, so why not make a club that essentially allows that to happen. When people use the High Heat 257+ driver, woods or hybrids they are just amazed when they don’t hit it off the center and it still goes straight and still goes far. Many people have tried it and many people have loved the High Heat 275+ drivers, woods and hybrid clubs.

If you want more information or want to get one for yourself to over to KNUTHGOLF.COM.

TaylorMade M4 Driver

TaylorMade M4 Driver

Taylormade m4 driver

By now you’re aware that TaylorMade’s latest “M Family” of metalwoods has moved on from the M1/M2 nameplates and has been replaced with the latest editions in the form of M3 and TaylorMade M4. In this review, we focus specifically on the mega forgiving but minimally adjustable M4 (which is the replacement for the previous M2 model).

What’s New for 2018?

The first thing you might notice is the TaylorMade M4 logo looks very similar to that of a certain line of high-performance European luxury brand automobiles whose slogan is “The Ultimate Driving Machine”. Perhaps the similarity is coincidence but we know better. Beyond the new graphics, there just happens to be some serious innovation going on here. New for 2018, Taylor-Made introduced TWIST FACE technology for greater accuracy, a new slot technology called “HAMMERHEAD” (shown above), for better ball speeds on primarily on lower face strikes, and it’s second addition of its Geocoustic sound enhancing shaped clubhead.

 

taylormade m4 head

The new silver crown on the latest M metalwoods looks every bit as sporty as the past versions with white trim. Notice the newly raised crown ridge on the toe portion of the carbon-fiber section, a subtle uptick in aerodynamics.

taylormade m4 crown

M4 features a red accent at the back of the crown (M3 has blue).

taylormade m4 face

If there’s a better looking big stick on the market, I’ve yet to see it. It should be no surprise that we gave M4 an A+ in the looks department.

Technology/Innovation

TWIST FACE on the TaylorMade M4 is really what the buzz is all about with the M3 & M4. Since the drivers of today all deliver big on distance, TaylorMade set out to create a way to help keep that distance in the shortgrass. I’ll attempt to give you the abridged version. Typically the two most common types of mishits for golfers with the driver are: High toe hit- (typically an inside out swing path) results in a low ball flight that dives left. Low heel hit – (typically an outside in path) produces a high spinning floater that sails way right. In traditional bulge and roll technology (that has been the standard for what seems like forever), that was created based on robot testing, these same mishits would curve back towards the target (it seemed like legit data), but in real human swings that vary in path, angle of attack and face direction, these shots more often than not would produce results with far worse results than the old “Iron Byron” robot showed.

TaylorMade tested tens of thousands of human swings and their data showed that some things could be changed in order to help bring those typical mis-hits closer to the fairway. Hence, Twist Face was born and introduced in the new M3 and TaylorMade M4.

taylormade m4 twist face
taylormade m4 twist face tech

So, How does the TWIST FACE concept work?

Providing a slightly more open high toe section with a fraction more loft, TWIST FACE is designed to enable the toe hit to start slightly more to the right (instead of that diving hook that finds the hazard or OB stakes left) veering it’s way back closer towards the fairway. To the other extreme, the low heel hit will play in more of a closed position – lessening the high right “crop duster” that plagues so many (including some of the world’s best like Rory McIlroy).

Can you actually see TWIST FACE on the TaylorMade M4? No, what you see on the commercial and in advertisements is an exaggerated example of the technology – it’s not noticeable to the naked eye (The actual amount of twist in each clubface area is less than a degree). Does it really work? We’ll discuss our findings during the test portion of this review.

The 41-gram rear weight bumper helps boost MOI making the TaylorMade M4 TM’s most forgiving driver. Geocoustic isn’t a new feature for TaylorMade, but it returns in an updated version for ’18 after being introduced in last year’s M2. Geocoustic is advanced sole shaping that delivers a sound that’s a bit more explosive than most TaylorMade drivers of the past, we really liked the bold tone of impact – it’s a subliminal anthem directed at your foursome serving notice that you just crushed one deep. According to TaylorMade, “As a by-product (of Geocoustic), the sole contouring frees up volume in the clubhead, allowing us to produce a bigger clubface with a 67% larger sweet spot.” Who doesn’t like a larger sweet spot?

taylormade m4 hammerhead

TaylorMade’s other innovation that’s been overlooked by many industry folks is their new HAMMERHEAD slot technology. In my opinion, it just might be the most significant, and here’s why: 1) It’s not a secret that last year, TaylorMade’s chief rival – Callaway introduced their “Jailbreak Technology” in their EPIC model. The rest is history, TaylorMade lost its hold on as the No.1 driver status (that it had for well over a decade). 2) TaylorMade M4 had to make a counterpunch and create a technology of their own that accomplishes at least the same level of performance. Brand loyalty is huge, but losing yards can threaten even the most loyal consumer. There was no choice, HAMMERHEAD is the correct volley for TaylorMade just from an actual performance comparison standpoint. 2b) TWIST FACE is a big deal for TM to get back on top in the marketplace, but HAMMERHEAD is like the O-Line on a football team, nobody pays any attention to it, until you don’t have a good one. Without it, you’re toast.

With so many of us product reviewers using incredible new technologies to track performance data, keeping ball speeds up even on those low face hits (distance killers) is essential. Anyone can create a driver that goes far when hit dead center, but when you can produce nearly the same yardage when hit all over the face, you’ve got a keeper. B+ on the Innovation ledger.

Gametime Setup/Stock offering

Sharp and clean at address (a solid A grade here), the M4 sets up really square. Fujikura Atmos Red comes standard as the stock powerplant offering on M4 (Mitsubishi Tensei White comes standard on the new M3). Atmos is geared towards fitting a wider spectrum of golfers, so due to its slightly softer profile and its high launch/mid spin, we had ours delivered in X flex. If you prefer TM offers customizing your M4 with Fujikura, Aldila, Matrix, Oban, True Temper, UST, Graphite Design and Mitsibishi as your choices of upgrade in shaft (most with no upcharge).

taylormade m4 shaft

TESTING

Our indoor test center was the PGA Learning Center in Port St.Lucie, technology powered by Foresight Sports GC Quad.

Testing is always a pleasure at the PGA Learning Center in Port St.Lucie on their Foresight GC Quad. The TaylorMade M4 produced consistent results. Throwing out the longest/shortest drives, the average = 102.3 mph swing speed, 152 ball speed, 13.6 launch, 2336 backspin, 236L side spin (draw), 252 yards carry/283 total yards (10 yards left of the centerline). Typically about as good as I can do from a performance standpoint.

I was most interested in what HAMMERHEAD and TWIST FACE would do for my misses. The new slot technology actually did show improvement on those low face hits that for me are normally about a 10% drain of carry distance (with last years TM model). Instead, with M4 it was closer to a 3% loss of carry. Wow! That could be the difference between carrying it over a hazard or bunker (before 225 yards – now 245).

I tried to discern if TWIST FACE was influencing the flight shape of my mishits in the simulator, but since you don’t get a true sense of ball flight indoors, I took the testing outdoors for multiple sessions both on the range and in game mode. What I found was interesting, it did seem like my high toe hits stayed right of what I expected when I was sure the hard draw would be the result. When I’m swinging well, the mid-high toe portion of the face is where I’ll tend to miss, but a few shots that came out of that spot (that usually comeback left) just stayed right. In other words my typical push draw just simply became a push. I noticed nothing different when I came out of swing and caught the shot on the low heel- still a spinny up shooter that looks like a right handed batter that pushed one towards “Pesky’s Pole”. So after several rounds, I collected no definitive data or opinion on TWIST FACE. It’s my belief that it may help a slight miss off the high toe, but also don’t expect that topspin push draw to come back as much. My suggestion: with TWIST FACE learn to aim a bit more down the middle. Is that such a bad thing . . .

Summary

The TaylorMade M4 is worthy . For those who want the latest tee box basher with the sound and feel we’ve come to expect from TaylorMade it passes all of the exams. Throw in ample forgiveness and performance minus all of the uber adjustability options (and at a cheaper price $429 to M3 at $499). Somehow, Bazzel, Tomo and the guys at TaylorMade are still finding ways to create better drivers. How much better is it than prior M products is up for debate, but if you’re still gaming outdated technology, the TaylorMade M4 could be the right choice for your game this summer (overall grade A-). As always, to make sure you get in the right set up for your game, go get fit by a certified club fitter.

For more info on TaylorMade products: taylormadegolf.com/

 


Jason  Bruno
GolfLife Tour Coverage
Cobra F-Max Offset Driver

Cobra F-Max Offset Driver

Golf Life was recently sent the F-Max Offset driver from Cobra Golf. In the video above we took it out to the course and provided you a review on what we thought.

The F-MAX Offset Driver is Cobra’s lightest and most forgiving driver engineered for golfers with moderate swing speeds who require maximum draw bias. Back, heel weighting and an offset hosel promotes straighter and higher launching drives. 

What does that mean

  • The back or heel is a fixed, back weight positioned near the heel promoting straighter, more forgiving ball flights. 
  • The Offset and Straight Neck has an offset hosel design with maximum draw bias or a non-offset, straight neck hosel with minimal draw bias to allow golfers to choose their level of forgiveness.
  • The Crown Alignment detail makes it easy to align the clubhead at address for straighter trajectories down the target line.

F-Max Offset DriverThe driver is available in a 9.5-, 10.5- and 11.5-degree versions for men. There is a 15-degree model of women golfers. 

The F-Max Offset driver is available for $299 over at Cobragolf.com. Head over there now to learn more!

Sentio Golf Putters – Feel Is The Difference

Sentio Golf Putters – Feel Is The Difference

Putting is one of the most important aspects of golf. However, putters have become a dime a dozen these days. Big name brands like Scotty Cameron or the big OEM companies are constantly putting out new versions of putters yearly. Big brands are not the only ones in the golf market. There are more small market putter brands popping up than I can count. One of those small market brands trying to make it in this crazy market is Sentio Golf. Golf Life got the chance to test their Sierra 101 Series putters.

Here at Golf Life we have reviewed a ton of putters that have hit the market. I have to say this is the first time we have seen anything like this. Sentio literally has a floating face. What does that mean exactly? The floating face technology separates the entire stainless steel face from the rest of the putter head with a vibration dampening TPE Polymer Core.

Sentio Putters

What does that Offer a Golfer?

  • SMOOTH YET CRISP FEEL
  • 3 DISTINCT RESPONSE LEVELS
  • EXCEPTIONAL DISTANCE CONTROL
  • OFF-CENTER FORGIVENESS

Sentio knows every golfer is different and want to give you options that fit your game. The Sierra 101 series comes in 3 different models to suit your preference. 

  • GREEN/SOFT – This model has a buttery-soft core, perfect for those who are used to playing with an insert, or who regularly putt on fast greens.
  • RED/MEDIUM – Our middle-feel option for general conditions; not too hot and not too soft.
  • BLUE/FIRM – For those who prefer a more solid feel, or who regularly putt on slow greens

If you liked our video review and would like to learn more, head over to SentioGolf.com and get one that fits your game!

Xenon Golf – Handcrafted Putters that make your jaw drop

Xenon Golf – Handcrafted Putters that make your jaw drop

Handcrafted Putters make your jaw drop

Xenon Golf PutterHave you ever had a day when the stars just align and things fall perfectly into place? We all dream about that happening, whether it be in your personal life, job or in this case golf reviews. I was given the awesome opportunity to go through the process of a custom putter build by the Xenon Golf Company out of Nashville, Tennessee. Small companies like Xenon exist out there and they will build you a custom putter to our liking. You can spend just about any amount of money you want. In the case of a Xenon Putter, you are truly talking about a one of a kind putter because each putter is handmade by Kenneth “Lumpy” Uselton.

These putters aren’t made in some huge factory with hundreds of employees running around the place. They are made in a rather modest workshop 200 square feet. That’s right 200 square feet, that’s a 20 foot by 10 foot building. Smaller than most two car garages. No air conditioning or creature comforts here, and we all know summers in Tennessee can get a little warm. Lumpy produces a couple hundred custom made putters a year. He makes putters out of all kinds of metals from common stainless steel and copper-nickel alloy to the more exotic Damascus steel and layered steel laminate Mokume-gane. Custom finishes, millings and stampings are all available to the customer.

Xenon Golf PutterThe process starts with receiving an order form from Xenon Golf Company. On this form are list of choices that you have to make before Lumpy can build you a putter. This had to be one of the hardest parts for me. What would your dream putter be like given the choice? What material should I choose? What stampings and options should I select? I really racked my brain for a long time deciding on them. I finally decided and these are the choices that I made.

I decided to go with an “Element” model (somewhat similar to a Anser in look) and these are the specifications I chose:

  • 34” in length
  • 350 grams weight
  • 3 degrees of loft
  • 70 degree lie angle
  • Full shaft offset
  • ¼ toe hang
  • Plumbers neck
  • Aluminum Bronze head with a Vintage Antique finish
  • Chopped sole (slot milled in bottom of the putter)
  • Brass “X” in the cavity
  • Jet Matte black steel shaft
  • Stampings on the toe and heel
  • Signature face milling
  • Orange “Pure” Xenon logo grip
  • Magnetic leather head cover by Delilah Club Covers

Next comes the wait, which seems like an eternity but actually isn’t when you look at it, as he is hand milling each one of these putters himself by welding, stamping, finishing, assembling, etc… I was sent a picture part way through the process of the putter after the milling was complete, before the custom stampings, face milling and Antique finish was completed. This was a very nice little tease! When the putter arrived it didn’t disappoint in any way shape or form! It far exceed my expectations in both the design, appearance and feel categories.

The Xenon Golf putter was more of a piece of artwork sculptured from metal than a putter one would use while playing golf. A golfer could spend more on what some may call custom putters from a major manufacturer, but what does that get you? A design that is not very unique or different from their standard issued putter with just a few customized items.

I would like to give my impressions of the putter from Xenon Golf in the following categories:

FeelXenon Golf Putter

The feel of the Xenon putter is very good. The putter is Aluminum Bronze, this material has a softer feel than Stainless Steel putters and is more resistant to rust than a carbon steel putter. If you are a golfer that is use to putting without a insert, you will really like this version. Some adjustment would be required if you are coming from an inserted putter. It has a nice consistency and roll off the face. Well done Xenon putters!

Forgiveness

Xenon Golf PutterThe forgiveness of the putter is very good. It is a ¼ toe hang putter with a full shaft offset so that design works great for a slight arc style putting stroke. Most golfers putt with an open-square-closed stroke where the putter moves on a slight arc (sometimes known as an in-to-in stroke or a barn door stroke). Heel and toe weighted putters have long been shown to twist less than any other style of putter with an off center hit. This means that the difference between where putts end up if struck by the sweet spot as compared with off-center hits is as small as possible.

Sound

The sound of the ball coming off the face of the Xenon putter is a very pleasant click. This comes from a combination of the putter materials and the “chopped sole”. This is a small slot cut into the bottom of the putter located just behind the face of the putter. I have always wanted a slot in the sole of my putter. The putter build has given me that opportunity.

Xenon Golf PutterAlignment

The only alignment aid on this putter is a white dot on top of the putter. A very simple way of aiming the putter but it works well for me personally because I putt while looking at the hole. I don’t need an over abundance of sight lines and other methods of alignments to take away from the appearance of the putter.

Quality of Construction

TXenon Golf Putterhe quality of the construction of the putter is second to none. You can tell right off that this a one of kind hand made putter, from the milling marks on the face of the putter, too the hand stampings on several surfaces of the putter. The addition of the brass “X” in cavity of the putter is one of those features you don’t get with a standard issue putter.

The Xenon logo grip from Pure has an excellent soft feel and just the right amount of tact to it. The putter cover is from Deliha Club Covers, Made in the USA. A magnetic closure keeps the cover tightly attached to the putter. Excellent graphics, and embroidery make this cover a perfect compliment to the putter.

Xenon Putter The complete process from start to finish was excellent with the Xenon Putter Company. If you are in the market for a “one of a kind” handmade putter be sure to take a look at them. They are on all of the social media platforms Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Xenon Golf Putter HeadcoverThe custom handcrafted putters are on full display with many pictures to look at. I bet you won’t find one putter that looks exactly like another. What’s great is that you can take the features you love from each putter and turn it into your own dream putter. So if there comes a day when the stars align and you feel the urge to make your dream come true, take a leap of faith and join the custom putter family.

Mike Hallee
Golf Life Contributor

Taylormade M1 Driver Review

Taylormade M1 Driver Review

TaylorMade M1 Driver

TaylorMade M1 Driver Review

In January of 2016, TaylorMade Golf introduced the M Family of metalwoods incorporating the use of carbon fiber with titanium to form a potent multi- material tee box launcher. This past December at Ibis Golf & Country Club in West Palm Beach (just minutes from LinksNation HQ) and weeks later at the PGA Merchandise Show in January, TaylorMade unveiled the 2nd generation of M metalwoods. By now you’ve seen them on tour and maybe even in your local retail shop, but what has changed since the original?

2017 / 2016

Taylormade M drivers

The new 2017 model on the left has a 6 layer carbon crown design featuring a slimmed down and flared white front section (Original 2016 model is pictured on the right). Does the new one look better, go farther, feel better? Some of those answers are subjective to the individual, but one thing is for sure, the bar was raised awfully high with the original ’16 models, they are absolute monsters off the box.

Any time you’re conducting a review of a product known for being the industry leader for well over a decade, there’s a certain buzz  and excitement that follows – and let’s be honest, what golfer doesn’t get excited over testing new drivers. We headed to PGA Village (PGA of America’s flagship property) in Port St.Lucie and their state of the art Foresight Sports Performance center for testing, then a round on the Wannamaker course.

TECH stuff

M Family Driver

The success of M1/M2 in 2016 was huge, elevating the #1 Driver in Golf to another stratosphere of big stick domination. So what could the R&D Team at TMAG possibly do to further the success of the M Family? The new slogan for 2017 – “Same Letter. Better Everything”. That’s great marketing, but will the performance bear it out? One thing is fact, the adjustability quotient has taken another leap forward. TM engineers saved 3 grams of weight by using a lighter 9-1-1 titanium alloy core skeleton paired with a carbon toe panel (’17 M1 has 43% more carbon fiber than last years model) which allows for a larger T track – providing even greater adjustability. (3 grams doesn’t seem like much to you and I, but in the engineering world it’s gold. These brainiacs fight for every milligram to improve their golf products).

Taylormade M1 Driver

The new T-track (shown in neutral setting) allows for 64% more front to back movement than the ’16 M1. As far as method of adjustability, nothing has changed – move the 12 gram weight back = higher launch/greater forgiveness, move it forward = lower launch/less spin. Move the 15 gram weight to the heel = more draw bias, towards the toe = more fade.

Taylormade M1 Driver

This view illustrates the refined sole design, as you can see the sole plate lips over the weight on each track, this equals less debris caught in the T-track and a sleeker sole. Streamlined from the original M1.

Gen One

Taylormade M2 Driver

The original M2 was our pick for the Best Driver of the Year in 2016, and quite simply it produced performance #’s that no driver in our stead ever has – EVER. In our opinion, it also produces the ideal sound and feel at impact. So the new M models have a ton to live up to.

Powerplant

Taylormade M1 Driver headcover

Stock shaft offerings for the 2017 M1/M2 : Mitsubishi Rayon Kuro Kage TiNi (shown above), Project X HZRDUS and Fujikura XLR8 56. Select shafts from Aldila, Fujikura, Matrix, UST, and Mitsubishi are available at no up charge.

Appearance

Taylormade M Family Drivers

Certainly appearance is subjective, some prefer last years traditional red/black color scheme over this years lime/charcoal combination. Personally, the color means less to me than the design aspects, and the more I look at the new models (M2 also shown) it reminds me of a high performance sports car – inspiring confidence.

Taylormade M1 Driver

M1 nameplate located on the rear section of the crown adds a nice touch.

Foresight Performance Testing

Performance simulator

Pictured above, a staff member at the PGA Learning Center works on his game as we set up shop on the adjoining Foresight Simulator. We’ve discussed innovation and appearance of M1, but we all know fancy claims and good looks won’t get you onto the shortgrass or produce distance gains. It was time to get to work . . .

Needing a base of comparison the testing began with my gamer (’16 M2) that’s equipped with an Aldila Rogue Silver 110msi stiff flex shaft. Although my swing speed usually tops out around 107 mph for step on it all out swings, my normal playing gear is right about 103 mph. Consistency & accuracy were the objectives here, so after a dozen or so swings reaching normal speed and distance #’s, we went straight at it with the new M1.

*Just a bit of background on my game: I’m a scratch player who prefers to work the ball, but have recently gone back to my natural right to left “push draw” – which means I start my ball barely right of target and it peels off just left of it’s starting point. I never want to see a pull, not even when I play a fade. My miss often stays straight or is a block right. When the miss goes both ways it’s a smoke & mirrors day for me at best. If the adjustabilty of M1 can narrow in the miss and tighten dispersion all while giving me the same carry and roll as the gamer then we’ll give it a huge thumbs up.

foresight sports

Within a half dozen swings after switching to M1, it was evident that the Mitsubishi Kuro Kage wasn’t the correct fit for my aggressive transition. Spin rates, launch angle and dispersion were all over the place. A quick swap into the Aldila Rogue, and instantly the #’s were nearly identical with the M2 gamer. After some fine tuning, we got the settings dialed in (I prefer a slightly open face and an upright lie angle) and the data showed a very tight dispersion pattern. In order to keep the testing non-bias for either model we alternated back and forth between heads after every 5 swings (once finished and the data collected, we eliminated the single best and worst extremes with each), and here were the final results via Foresight.

Taylormade M1 Driver statsTaylormade M2 Driver stats

The Foresight results produced virtually identical performance stats (with launch angle being the only real significant difference). What does this mean? It means on paper the new M1 is on par with the absolute best driver that we’ve ever tested. Driver performance on an an indoor launch monitor is just one element of testing, these stats are just the beginning. The “reality” test would be out on the course, and luckily we had an afternoon tee time set up on the Fazio designed Wannamaker course next door at PGA Golf Club.

Feel/Sound

The original M metalwoods produce my personal favorite sound and feel of any driver previously tested or gamed here at LinksNation (2014 SLDR 460 gets runner-up honors) and that’s saying a bunch. The best way to describe the sound is as a muted thwack with a springy feel off the sweetspot when it compresses the ball at 100+ mph at impact. The new M1 feels really solid at impact and has a slightly louder thwack, somewhere similar to the SLDR.

On Course Performance

It was finally time to put the new TM weaponry to the real exam and see if it could be trusted under pressure in real conditions. It was blowing 20 mph all day on the Wannamaker course with intermittent precipitation, so this would be a stern test. Immediately the M1 impressed in a large way, rippin slight draws through even the toughest left to right crosswinds (typically the toughest wind for right handers). M1 showed it could launch high if need be, but its natural tendency (under this operator’s guidance) was a medium trajectory flat bullet. So far so good . . .

15th at Fazio's Wannamaker

Take a good look at the picture above, the 15th at Fazio’s Wannamaker is where it was put up or shut time for the industry leader’s new crown jewel. The tee box is actually 150 yds back and tucked to the right of this view with the entire carry over water. At 271 yards to the front pin, it would normally be nothing more than hybrid and wedge, but this was a driver test not a stroke play event, so taking on “Fools Gold” was mandatory.

A flared crop duster to the right would certainly end up in the water hazard, and at 255 yds to the front edge into the cross breeze it would take something solid. I decided to take dead aim at the mound just left of the green figuring a slight push would be online with the flag, a straight ball would possibly bounce back towards the green, and a draw would end up pin high in the swale leaving a tough but do-able up n down. The tee shot was struck solid and flew right at the intended target, it had a slight draw of about 3 yds and carried to the mound pin high and bounced down into the swale exactly the correct distance. After a decent lob shot and two putt for par, the questions were answered . . .

This was not the usual “get used to the driver somewhere on the front 9” type of experience that often accompanies new driver on the course testing, it was an instant love affair of long and precise tee shots all day long. Basically point and shoot from the every tee box, golf journalists Len Ziehm and Dan Hauser were first hand witnesses to the M1 highlights, “get your own”, I said. The exam was passed and with honors.

Summary

Certainly the Indian has something to do with how a test subject performs, but after you’ve done enough of these reviews you know a blue ribbon arrow when you see one. The ’17 M1 is just that – worthy. 

Is the Gen2 version an upgrade though? That depends on exactly where you stand. If you’re already gaming the original M1/M2 driver, than any type of distance upgrade is likely to be minimal at best, but if you’re in the market and want the very latest top of the line technology, it’s a no brainer – but keep this in mind, the proper shaft and head model are absolutely critical as we detailed during testing. GET PROPERLY FIT, it WILL change your game.

Value wise, there are good deals to be had on the original M drivers Dustin won the U.S Open with, JDay ruled the world rankings with and Justin Rose won the Gold Medal with – TM is the #1 driver brand in the game and for good reason. As far as my gamer is concerned, the testing will continue as we try to figure out exactly which one to go with, but as of this moment there’s a refined new “M” in the bag . . .

For more info on M1 and Taylormade products: http://taylormadegolf.com/

You can check out a video from Golf Life on the Taylormade M1 Driver here.

 

Picture
Jason  Bruno
LinksNation.com & GolfLife.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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